Latest

Remembering Marty

Locus is reporting that speculative fiction anthologist Martin Harry Greenberg passed away yesterday.

I’m not going to offer up a list of his many awards, honors, and editorial credits. If you don’t know who he is, I urge you to look him up. What I really want to say is that it was Marty, together with then-Bantam editor Robert Simpson, who bought my first story, back before I got my first job with a publisher. That was in the late ’80s, when I was just a grunt at the now-defunct 59th Street branch of Forbidden Planet in Manhattan.  Marty visited New York City around that time, and I got to meet him in person. He even took me to lunch to discuss some editorial opportunities he had for me. To this day, I have no idea what he saw in me, but I never forgot his kindness. And when I became an editor myself, I always tried to pay it forward.

I remember Marty as a vibrant, enthusiastic gentleman with great patience and great vision, speaking with pride and excitement about his new baby daughter. I remember the chance he took on me, a novice, and I remember that he was one of the people who gave me my first big break in my chosen profession.

Marty’s passing makes the publication of my new story bittersweet. And when I start the new week at Tor on Monday morning, I’ll remember it was Marty who opened the first door.

Advertisements

First Bookwatch Winner!

The first winner of the Declassified Bookwatch is Joe Giannetti, who spotted copies of the new Star Trek Vanguard book on display at the Barnes & Noble bookstore at Neshaminy Mall in Bensalem, Pennsylvania.  Joe is the first person to send me a photo of the book for sale in a brick-and-mortar store, and for that, he wins a free copy of Declassified signed by me, Dayton Ward, Kevin Dilmore, and David Mack.

There’s still two more chances to win, so get to your favorite bookshop, get clicking, and email those photos to marco@otherworldeditorial.com.

And congratulations to Joe!

Sci-Fi Bulletin

My good friend Paul Simpson has gotten the band back together from the now-defunct Dreamwatch magazine and TotalSciFi web site, and launched SciFiBulletin.com, an all-new site with news and reviews from the myriad worlds of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Check it out: http://www.scifibulletin.com

Bookwatch!

It’s June 2, the bound-book date for Star Trek Vanguard: Declassified! This means the initial run of the book has been printed and will shortly be shipping out to all points civilized. Over the next week or two, it may even start appearing on bookstore shelves in advance of it’s “official” June 28 street date.

So Vanguard fans, please take note: the Bookwatch begins now. The first three people to email me a photo showing Declassified available in a bookstore will each receive a free copy of the book signed by all four contributing authors: Dayton Ward, Kevin DilmoreDavid Mack, and myself. The winning photos will be posted on my blog and my Facebook wall, and the autographed books will be mailed out during the month of July.

Book photos should be emailed to marco@otherworldeditorial.com. Don’t send me your mailing address unless I’ve notified you you’re one of the first three. Good luck!


Two weeks later…

I had intended to post an update sooner, but it’s been a busy couple of weeks.  The new job has been great, my coworkers are awesome, and I even found a great place for gyoza. I also picked up two new OE clients during this time, celebrated my oldest son’s acceptance to the arts program of his first-choice high school, and joined my youngest for the start of his first season of little league. In summary, life is good.

Below are some shots I took of my new professional digs, the truly amazing Flatiron Building.  The first shot is the building as seen from the Northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 23rd Street. 


Below is what it looks like from the Southwest corner of of Fifth and and 22nd Street. 

This last image shows the Broadway side.


Flatiron Bound

Earlier this week, I accepted a position on the editorial team at Tor Books.

For those who may not know it, Tor is a leading publisher of speculative fiction and fantasy, headquartered in Manhattan’s landmark Flatiron Building.  I’ll have the privilege of working with David G. Hartwell and Stacy Hague-Hill, two luminaries in the field. I start Monday.

I’m very excited. This is an incredible opportunity for me to broaden my horizons and grow as an editor, doing the work I love.

Self-Publishing: Yea or Nay?

There’s an interesting conversation about self-publishing going on at The Practical Free Spirit, a blog by Amy Sundberg. Definitely worth checking out.  I tend to agree with the comments made by my esteemed friend and colleague, author, small-press publisher, and all around Renaissance Man Lawrence M. Schoen, which he reposted on his blog. I’m curious to know what others think. What say you?

Bring on the Weekend!

My deadlines for the week have been met, so I can go to LunaCon guilt-free. The difference this will make to my ability to enjoy myself and make the most of the con cannot be understated. Oh, I’ll still have plenty of work waiting for me come Monday, but it won’t weighing on my mind all weekend.

The con has published its programming schedule, and the selection of panels is every bit as interesting as I’d hoped. I’m focusing on two tracks: business and writing, with a couple of stopovers in literature. In between, I’m looking forward to catching up with old friends, and making new ones.

Familiar Strangers

Back when I acquired and edited books on staff at Simon & Schuster, I was frequently struck by how different the reading experience was, going from manuscript to galley pages. Seeing the text designed and formatted, as it would look to paying readers, was always sobering. It crystallized the book, giving permanence to what had previously been fluid.

Flash forward to today, when I face the same experience, squared: The first-pass pages for Vanguard: Declassified are in, and here before me, currently spanning pages 187-277, is the story I wrote, The Ruins of Noble Men, as it will look when (hopefully) others read it.

It’s been a long time since I’ve seen my own words make this sort of journey. Yes, I’ve written plenty of back cover copy that was published, and every six weeks I still get to see the pieces I write for Star Trek Magazine make it into print. But this is different. Crafting fiction is an act of intimacy, and what comes of it is at once revelatory and misleading. Stories are reflections of their tellers, to varying degrees, but what readers may infer from one about the other is anyone’s guess.

But that’s not really what this is about. My thoughts as I revisit Ruins with fresh eyes have less to do with what the reactions to my novella may be than with managing my instinct to pick nits…and just how odd my story now looks.

In pages, Ruins suddenly seems both familiar and very strange. I know I wrote the words, but they’ve taken on new dimension. It’s a little like seeing my kids today and recalling what they were like when they were much younger, and realizing that while I take joy in how they’ve grown, part of me wonders if I’ve shaped them as well as I could have. Intellectually, I know those doubts are natural, and second-guessing my choices at this stage—well, that way lies madness. Still, I wonder.

Then again, maybe that’s the point. It’s not about what I may have done right or wrong in writing The Ruins of Noble Men, but how that experience has affected me. I’m the familiar stranger…standing on the other side the editorial divide with a renewed appreciation for what storytellers go through in trying to spin tales they’re proud to put their names on.

%d bloggers like this: